Demographics

Initial Unemployment Insurance Claims Filed in Ohio's Counties

A few weeks ago I was grumbling about the state not releasing the weekly county-level initial and continued unemployment insurance claims data in anything but an old pdf format. How old? You know, the kind the Census Bureau gave up in the 1990s. Anyhow, turns out the PDFs could be scraped with relatively little pain; thank you {tabulizer}!! So here are the data, only the weeks in 2020 for now but the plan is to update this weekly through the crisis, and to go back over the years as well, at least until September/October 2017, the earliest data releases I can find.

The Homeless Today

Note: This post is in progress. Every year the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) releases the Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress (AHAR) in two parts. Part 1 provides Point-in-Time (PIT) estimates, offering a snapshot of the homeless (both in shelters and unsheltered) during the last 10 days of January. These estimates are rolled out for Continuums of Care (CoC) – local planning bodies responsible for coordinating the full range of homelessness services in a geographic area, which may cover a city, county, metropolitan area, or an entire state.

Resident Population Change in Ohio

Now that the population change estimates are out, here is a quick peek at Ohio’s estimates. First up – the extent of gains and losses in our counties. No surprises here; Most of the Appalachian counties have seen population losses. Specifically, Appalachia lost 48,211 persons while the rest of the state gained 200,896 persons. The largest gains were in Franklin (146,768), Delaware (30,654), Warren (19,353), Hamilton (14,312) and Butler (14,243).

Poverty and Health Insurance in Appalachia

The Census Bureau’s Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) Program and the Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) Program are two of my favorite ‘go-to’ sources for small-area estimates. Both are easily grabbed via tidycensus so the first thing I’d like to do is explore county-level trends going as far back as is possible – 2008-2016 for SAHIE, 2006-2017 for all SAIPE estimates except for school-age (5 to 17 in families) poverty rate estimates that allow for longer comparisons (2005-2017).

Appalachia: A Profile in Numbers

The founding report of the Appalachian Regional Commission does a wonderful job of highlighting the state of affairs in Appalachia circa 1950 and 1960. The prose is not too shabby even if it careens every now and then into the romantic: “Graphs and tables can hardly relate the acutely personal story of a child in a remote valley, his horizon of opportunity limited to the enclosing hills; nor the despair of his father, who, idled by forces beyond his control and seeing no prospect of future employment, must live month in and month out with the vision of that child repeating his own history.