Ohio

Census 2020 Response Rates

COVID-19 may have been impartial in that it has affected just about every facet of our lives but its decade-long impact is likely to manifest itself in a larger Census undercount in some areas than in others. In this post I wanted to take a quick look at how our fair state is faring (no pun intended). Let us start with a view from the eagles’ crag – looking at our Census Tracts.

Unemployment in Ohio's Counties

It has been a while since I created a new post and although there have been a few in the pipeline, I cannot find the peace of mind to sit down and work through them to create something worthwhile. To assuage the feeling of falling behind, here is a quick post tracking unemployment rates in our counties. The data are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. library(tidyverse) read_delim("https://www.bls.gov/web/metro/laucntycur14.txt", "|", escape_double = FALSE, col_names = FALSE, trim_ws = TRUE, skip = 6) -> laucnty colnames(laucnty) = c("laus_area_code", "statefips", "countyfips", "areaname", "period", "civ_laborforce", "employed", "unemployed", "urate") The August 2020 data are provisional estimates and should be discounted for good reason.

Initial Unemployment Insurance Claims Filed in Ohio's Counties

A few weeks ago I was bemoaning the fact that the state was not releasing the weekly county-level initial and continued unemployment insurance claims data in anything but an old pdf format. How old you ask? You know, the kind the Census Bureau gave up in the 1990s. Anyhow, turns out the PDFs could be scraped with relatively little pain; thank you {tabulizer}!! So here are the data, only the weeks in 2020 for now but the plan is to update this weekly through the crisis, and to go back over the years as well, at least until September/October 2017, the earliest data releases I can find.

Resident Population Change in Ohio

Now that the population change estimates are out, here is a quick peek at Ohio’s estimates. First up – the extent of gains and losses in our counties. No surprises here; Most of the Appalachian counties have seen population losses. Specifically, Appalachia lost 48,211 persons while the rest of the state gained 200,896 persons. The largest gains were in Franklin (146,768), Delaware (30,654), Warren (19,353), Hamilton (14,312) and Butler (14,243).

Opioid Encounters in Ohio Counties

The opioid crisis is an issue in most parts of the country and Ohio is no exception, with some of the highest numbers of Fentanyl encounters reported by law enforcement. Although one could, I suppose, try to identify county-level deaths due to drug overdoses via CDC Wonder, this is a quick look at the data provided by the Ohio Hospital Association’s Overdose Data Sharing Program.

Opportunity Youth in Ohio

A client needed state-level estimates of the percent of opportunity youth (defined either as 16-19 or 16-24 year-old persons who are neither in school nor employed) in each state plus Washington DC. The end result would be three years of estimates that matched the numbers put out by Measure of America’s yearly reports on the subject. I had used Anthony Damico’s fantastic repository Analyze Survey Data for Free for BRFSS, DHS, and other data but never with the Census Bureau’s Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS) data.

Monitoring the Hocking River

It is yet another rainy day but not really since the Hocking River that meanders through our town is under flood-watch. Things must be bad enough else why would the University cancel all classes for Monday. To whit: “A forecast for heavy rains and high winds have resulted in a flood warning for Athens County beginning this weekend into Monday. Based on current forecasts, specific areas on campus may be impacted by flooding Sunday evening into Monday morning.