Resident Population Change in Ohio

Appalachia Ohio Census

Now that the population change estimates are out, here is a quick peek at Ohio’s estimates. First up – the extent of gains and losses in our counties. No surprises here; Most of the Appalachian counties have seen population losses. Specifically, Appalachia lost 48,211 persons while the rest of the state gained 200,896 persons. The largest gains were in Franklin (146,768), Delaware (30,654), Warren (19,353), Hamilton (14,312) and Butler (14,243). The greatest losses were in Cuyahoga (36,258) and Lucas (11,916).

Ani Ruhil true
12-17-2020

This post was originally written on 2019-04-18

Now that the population change estimates are out, here is a quick peek at Ohio’s estimates. First up – the extent of gains and losses in our counties. No surprises here; Most of the Appalachian counties have seen population losses. Specifically, Appalachia lost 48,211 persons while the rest of the state gained 200,896 persons. The largest gains were in Franklin (146,768), Delaware (30,654), Warren (19,353), Hamilton (14,312) and Butler (14,243). The greatest losses were in Cuyahoga (36,258) and Lucas (11,916).

Within Appalachia, Clermont (8,101), Holmes (1,529), Athens (1,054), and Muskingum (97) were the only counties to gain population; all remaining 28 counties saw losses. Of this group, Trumbull (11,698) and Mahoning (9,146) had the largest declines.

Let us start with something simple: How many counties had more births than deaths and what counties were these?

Change of any sort invariably begs the question: What is driving this change? Well, we have data on the core sources available to us so let us look at these usual suspects – births, deaths, domestic net migration, and international net migration.

Turns out that births and deaths are fairly evenly balanced across the years, but not so net migration. Except for Clermont, every county has lost people to domestic migration, with only two counties – Athens and Mahoning – seeing sizable gains from international migration. We see sporadic spikes in net domestic migration in a few counties in some years, Athens, Muskingum, and Ross, for example, but it is unclear what is driving these jumps.

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Citation

For attribution, please cite this work as

Ruhil (2020, Dec. 17). From an Attican Hollow ...: Resident Population Change in Ohio. Retrieved from https://aniruhil.org/posts/2020-12-17-resident-population-change-in-ohio/

BibTeX citation

@misc{ruhil2020resident,
  author = {Ruhil, Ani},
  title = {From an Attican Hollow ...: Resident Population Change in Ohio},
  url = {https://aniruhil.org/posts/2020-12-17-resident-population-change-in-ohio/},
  year = {2020}
}